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and jim demint has been talking about with internal circumstances, credibility of the research, the numbers are adjusted or fixed, the minute you do that you know your intellectual adversaries, we know your friends have gone over the line again. we knew that was the very first place that had to be covered and had to start sticking our issues carefully and some of those, i will never forget there will be an expansion of medicare proposed by senator ted kennedy that should be reason enough to have opposed it. we looked up the numbers and said this is in the $2 billion increase they say it is going to be. it will be closer to $10 billion. fear the good friends in the congressional budget office, send it over to the congressional budget office, they did, the congressional budget office came back and said the number was a little more. they justified our number, this president finished the number and said to people maybe we can rely on it and mandate leadership came along and fooled that story and told it so well in the first paragraph. >> what release strikes me in writing about exp
asked. i do have one nature requests. yesterday we had a briefing by jim clapper on the intelligence budget going forward and produced a chart, which basically showed the ongoing sequester budget and other i would ask if you could check within perhaps, it is chart number 11 in his presentation. give us a similar visual breakdown of what your budget looks like, including as we now know the sequester on an ongoing basis. if we don't do anything about it, what does it do? i found this information yesterday to be very important because it shows real cuts. not cuts to grow, the real teeming nations of the funds available and it would be helpful to the committee to see that data as the books over the next 10 years, you look at the direct is chart and you'll see what i'm saying. >> we will, senator. thank you. >> one other quick comment and i'm sure you fellas know this as well as i do. one of the first things is deferring maintenance. but deferring maintenance isn't saving. if they cause someone has to pay in the future and i'm sure you agree. >> we do agree. >> you actually end up paying
name is jim rainey, more recently a political writer at "the l.a. times." the couple announcements, everyone should turn off their cell phones. probably turn them off, even if they're on vibrate. richard is particularly sensitive. is a cell phone goes off, he will hunt you down and correct it. after the session, there are going to be signing of the folks here about today and the signing area is area one, which you can look on a map where someone will direct you. you're also not opposed to record this. i'm going to introduce the three panelists, starting in the middle with jon wiener. john teaches at you see irvine and has contributed an editor to the nation agassi. he also is a weekly radio program wednesdays at 4:00 p.m. on 90.7 fm. he is best known for suing the fbi for their files on john lennon. that story was told in the book, give me some truth, the john lennon ei trials. his most recent book is how we forgot the cold war, historical journey across america, which you can pick up later and get signed to john. that is john in the middle. next we've got the brass who has a home
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
. at the same time, and we were talking about this, jim and i, before the battle began. the same thing happened with yosemite. you have to believe that this place for your putting a marker down in discovering was absolutely pristine. no one had ever lived there. it was too inaccessible. so flattering to the gills of these men that they could brave that terrifying wilderness. but it was based on the fiction. >> and that fiction in both cases is that the native americans had never lived there and in the case of yellowstone the fiction on with the park and the idea of the park continued to be based well into the 20th-century was that the indians had been so eager and superstitious that they had been terrified of the place. in fact, go into the historical record and they were in and out all the time. hunting, sending out were parties. it would crisscross the from the with the buffalo grove seasonally. it would go into a sitting kraft tech kraft arrowheads. that of sitting cliff functioned as a demilitarized zone. and they went there for six reasons. in many cases their records of various tied to a
-americans and other people of color in the jim crow not just south of the north to map. >> in my book i talk about confronting and discussing with the president of "msnbc" in 2010 about pat buchanan and him being on that channel and saying you have a guy who is essentially friendly with white separatist, friendly with white supremacists. he has written a book that says america's diversity is its downfall. why is this guy in your channel? he said zero code you know he has a point of view that we should feature. ..
unemployed during the great depression, and you had jim crow where it was legal and de facto segregation. you didn't find the same kind of criminality. we have spent $16 trillion since 1965 on poverty, and what we've done is we've destabilized families. that is why when a kid sees a gang banger, as you mentioned, he looks at that gang banger and thinks, hey, this is what i want to be. he doesn't have a father to say, wait a second, this is not the way to go. hit the books two good, hard hours a day. finish high school, don't have a kid before you're 20 years old and get married before you have that kid. if you do that, you will not be poor. the question we have to ask ourselves is, what policies are we doing that are giving people the incentive or disincentive to follow that formula? >> host: larry elder, a conversation between you and your mother beginning with your mother. your mother thought -- your father thought small. don't make the same mistake. that's unfair. oh, here you go again, defending him. he's not donald trump. he was a wimp, she said. >> guest: yeah. my mother -- she was in a
reform was being debated former senator jim demint from south carolina told his colleagues the need to vote against obama cared cared we need to break the obama administration. senator mcconnell for senate majority leader from the republicans announcing in 2010 that his highest priority, the senate majority leader was making barack obama the one-term president. if we had a coalition presidency were each party would elect a partner it wouldn't stand to gain as much clinical opposition. no matter what they did it was still share the white house with the other party so then it would be much freer to judge legislative proposals on their merits. so to put it another way, it's not surprising when you have a winner-take-all election for presidency whose power has grown to a level of the presidency you shouldn't be surprised that we have high levels of partisan conflict. indeed if you go back the increase in partisan conflict, to go back to the 50s and 60's there is much more of a cross party lines. if you look at partisan conflict graph it has risen since the 40s in the 50s grassley to lev
completely agree. one of the close i found i especially really like was from a former congressman jim kline and he said it's a little hard to believe that your nonfiction book you can't put down. and i thought that it was especially appropriate because if you like this book, it's different from a lot of nonfiction work that i've read. and that it really does read like a thriller. it really does, it takes these little discussions, and jack should manatee, humanity side to it. >> guest: we like to think it's an important book in the sense that it tells you how the court works. there are so few good books out there that explains what's the process, how do they go about this, how do they decide these cases, what are they saying to one another? we see these cases that split the court five before. what do they think? to the personal this get into it? so it's about not just about capital punishment. it's a book about how the court operates. >> guest: when he did get into those in the library of congress, the memorandum, the notes back and forth between the justices that are available him and a lot
f. kennedy. you're here at history, the cold war, hollywood and beyond. and i'm jim rain yes. i am a media writer and more recently political writer "los angeles times." i want to make a first announcement. first, everybody turn all your cell phones. just turn them off. even if they're on vibrate. richard is particularly sensitive. he won't like that if a cell phone goes off, he will hunt you down and he will correct it. after the session, like after most of our sessions here, there are going to be signings of the books you're going to hear about today. and the signing area is area one, which you can look on a map or someone out here can direct you. so, that's all. you're also not supposed to record this. i'm going to introduce our three panelists, starting in the middle with jon wiener. jon teaches history at the ic irvine, he host as weekly radio program, wednesdays at 4:00 p.m. on kpfk, 90.7fm. guest moan for suing the fbi for their files on john lennon. that story was told in the book, give me some truth, the john lennon fbi files. his most recent book is how we forget the cold
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
the changes of the way it operates. but as jim said if you change medicare you're likely to have ripple effects that could be very positive for the rest of the health sector. the question is, can you get >> of course, that does say that it is not a fortune teller or an accurate one in the projections are faulty but in fact, the program has then better with per-capita prescription drug spending than the rest of the country. that is a good indication. and two seniors make a choice is? this is a fear everyone has. so here i go to part d again. what a lot of analysts who don't like the idea have said is i . >> is an exciting time. population reasserting is growing at a tremendous pace as baby boomers aged to there golden years we're at an important evolution. these leading-edge consumers and represent the beginning of the epic wave of growth has statistics were mentioned at the end of the decade, a 64 million people will be enrolled in medicare. 40 million more or 28% more than today. and also the population will look differently as the boomers age because of there unique qualities and char
agricultural. thank you all very very much for being here. megan smith, jim kolbe and judson please come forward. we are going to go straight through the noon hour because of the numbers we have. some senators have been thinking of going in for lunch and other meetings that are taking place but we will begin with megan smith who is commissioner of the vermont commission of tourism appointed by -- in 2011. before that she was in the vermont legislature and before she became commissioner she and her husband owned and operated the vermont in which is a very nice place. for over a dozen years. ms. smith, go ahead. >> chairman lacie ranking member grassley members of the committee i'm pleased to be here today on behalf of the vermont department of tourism and marketing and the broader traveling community to highlight the importance of travel related provisions included in immigration reform. vermont is very dependent on tourism. our percentage of jobs in the industry is twice the natural -- national average of 38%. the majority of our businesses are small and family-owned and agri-tourism is
in the united states senate joking or perhaps half joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spalding and the heritage foundation itself so very valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case for conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, and outspoken partisanship almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on pote sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend itself past gains -- its past gains from conservative reform. but megativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that lib
that an agreement and all the responsibility for the gaza strip and hamas? >> good question. >> jim, the microphone is coming. >> good to see you again. as you knoi m believer in when yowritwhen you said d so forgive me for what i'm about to say that i'm very frustrated middle east peace activist for those of you that money i've been involved in this for over 23 years trying to organize the churches in this area and have spoken in other parts of the country as well. so, with that in mind please forgive me because this is a harsh question you as well as everyone in this room i think you are all living in a fantasy and i am, too and here is the problem. in your presentation, you talked about the arab street and how connected they are and you're absolutely right. but you didn't with the public opinion in this country. you have got to. we are democracy and we are not disconnected from the public opinion. when you look as i have done at public opinion onisrael and palestine for the last 20 years, guess what, over 50% of americans support israel. less than 10% with a few exceptions, the war was one of th
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
by retiring senator jim bunting. he won decisively in the general. when he got to the senate, he quickly founded the tea party caucus. finally, for you breakfast tea party buff, a group of which i may be the only member, of our nearly 3800 breakfasts, only two times have we had both a father and a son as guests. we hosted former representative ron paul in september 2011. the only other father/son team was mitt romney and his dad, michigan governor george romney. so much for biography and breakfast trivia. now on to mechanical manners. as always, we're on the record. please, no live blogging or tweeting, in short, no filing of any kind while the breakfast is underway. there's no embargo when the breakfast is over except that c-span has agreed to the to use video of the session for at least an hour after the breakfast ends to give those of us in the room a chance to file. if you'd like to ask a question, please, do the traditional thing and send me a subtle, nonthreatening signal, and i'll happily call. we'll start off by offering our guest the opportunity to make some opening comments. an
activated and incident management assistant jim, three preliminary damage assessment teams, and we are also standing by to assist in any other way. our eoc remains at level three, which is at increased readiness. we will continue to monitor the events over the course of the day and provide you with updates as they are relevant. i might add, mr. chairman, that many of the things i've just gone through are examples of the kinds of activities that have been supported by the committee, through fema, through the various grants that we supply, search and rescue being a good example of the kinds of things that grants have been supporting increasing our capacity for response and resilience as a nation. so that is the most recent on west, texas. with respect to boston, we are, we are investi this as an act of terror. we ae assisting. ice is part of the jttf. we have over four dozen ice agents now assigned to the boston office helping in the investigation. cdp is assisting in a number of tays immediately after the we work to close logan, the ground air for a few hours and to institute special targeti
that this is the law of the land and going forward i think you will see that. >> host: one question from jim. he writes i'm 62 in good health, why not just go without until something comes of? >> guest: one reason is you will have to pay a fine. it's low in the first year, only $95. it goes up in a few years to 2% of hearing, or $700 or if you sign up for coverage although people worry the penalties are too low. but like anyone, as my mother used to tell me don't go a day without health insurance. you never know when you are going to have a concussion and you never know when you're going to be in a car accident. is it really a risk you want to take? >> host: going to ted from huntington new york on our republican line. good morning, you're on with jenny gold. >> caller: good morning. i would like to know about the policy you're in new york. i want to move out of new york. can this policy follow me you know to another state? or if -- >> host: do you have to change policies with each state you are in? is that what you're asking? >> caller: yes. >> guest: the thing about this lot is it's a state-by-state
, that is the --. >> host: charles there is tweet relating to what you're saying. jim writes can an american citizen be considered an enemy combatant? >> guest: absolutely goes back to the civil war. goes certainly to world war ii. anwar al-awlaki was american-born. president obama use ad drone to kill him in the wilds of yemen. if you, if you fill eight yourself with enemy forces and you go to war against american citizens and you kill americans will fully and you do so on behalf of a movement or enemy forces then indeed you can be considered an enemy combatant. being a enemy combatant simply because you're an american citizen. if in world war ii you went over and joined nazi forces were you not a enemy combatant? of course you were. . . >> he didn't treat those terrible tragedies as access war, but appropriately treated them as heinous criminal acts to be investigated, prosecuted, and appropriately punishes. >> host: al-alwaki was an american citizen, kimed on orders of president obama. did president obama violate the constitution by doing that? >> guest: well, actually, we have a lawsuit in which
the period of jim crow. that is our live coverage for today and we hope your life again tomorrow. right now we are going to go to the hancock foundation building and this is where the history panel here at "the los angeles times" festival of books is just beginning. you are watching booktv on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] >> will you let me know when we are supposed to start? [laughter] >> good morning. that is my signal. my name is tim newton on back of "the los angeles times" and i'm pleased to welcome you to the 2013 festival of books. books. more specifically i'm delighted to welcome this morning to today's panel which brings some really remarkable authors to talk about their latest work and the idea behind him. before we get going i have been handed a piece of paper that says it's critically important that i read this. please silence all cell phones and i also need to tell you there is a book signing following the session here the book signing for this panel is in the staging area number one. i am told this is on the festival map and the center of the event program so the office h
on this particular issue to comment on this and on her question of the political will. >> thank you very much, jim. if i knew the answer on political will, i suppose there would be more prophetic qualities to my history. one hopes that we will see it, one hopes that we will see immigration and gun control and other efforts. i spent my life as a diplomat and spent a good part of that life trying to importune other governments to live up to the rule of law. i was cha gripped, embarrassed -- chagrined, embarrassed and, indeed, in many ways felt undermined by the notion that our country which instructed me on numerous occasions to uphold the rule of law particularly indefinite detention without trial was something that we now practice and continue to practice despite all of the questions that people tend to want to raise about a war and prisoners of war and all of the rest. my sense is that we need a specific way forward. the report contains recommendations on a specific way forward; simply trial or military commission with rights and privileges equal to our article iii court or system. if that won't
to the republicans, with a primary part of voting rights and citizenship and naacp informed and in the jim crow? and did you know that most african-americans were republicans at one time? i was told that in no uncertain terms that but i think the vast majority of the public, i think you'd find a 90% of the public had no idea that republicans help to found the naacp or. so some people think it is presumptuous and i should be talking about it, well, we need to talk about it. then i messed up on the senator's name, edward brooke. it's like, i'm human. i forgot his day. i knew his name but i forgot. it wasn't like it was a part of my speech and i forgot. it was in my question and into. i forgot his name. but the point i was making that was from edward brooke was he was asking in his 90s about the rich history of the republican party in academic and and he was asked, you know, his response was, he said, well, if the democrats had this history you would hear about it nonstop and he said, the indication was it was a problem republicans didn't talk about it it is harder for me but i'm not have been ame
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24